[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBolls, Paul David, 1966-eng
dc.contributor.authorWu, Nan, 1978-eng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 19, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Paul Bollseng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description"December 2012"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This study explores how presentation format and information density affect resource allocation and memory. A psychological experiment was conducted in the PRIME lab where resource allocation and memory were measured using secondary task reaction times (STRTs) during message presentation and recognition accuracy, response latency, sensitivity, and criterion bias in a yes-no recognition test. The project used the Limited Capacity Model of Motivated Mediated Message Processing and Signal Detection Theory as its theoretical framework. It looked into STRTs, recognition accuracy, response latency, sensitivity, and criterion bias. Ten hypotheses was proposed to investigate how presentation format and information density would affect the resource allocation and information processing of multimedia messages. Significant effects of presentation format were found on recognition accuracy, response latency, sensitivity, and criterion bias data. The analysis also revealed significant effects of information density on recognition accuracy, sensitivity, and criterion bias. Results from this study may clarify understanding of how viewers process messages in different presentation formats and offer insights for future studies. Also, it may help media professionals choose the most appropriate presentation format to communicate the message most effective.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 124 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/33255
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectresource allocationeng
dc.subjectresource memoryeng
dc.subjectsecondary task reaction timeeng
dc.subjectmultimedia messageseng
dc.titleHow can they remember it?: the effect of presentation format and information density on mulitmedia message processingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record