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dc.contributor.authorLyon, Coreyeng
dc.contributor.authorSchnall, Janet G.eng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.description.abstractFor children with primary nocturnal enuresis, treatment with enuresis alarms reduced the number of wet nights by almost 4 per week, with almost half of patients remaining dry for 3 months after treatment (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, based on a systematic review of homogeneous randomized control trials [RCTs]). Desmopressin (DDAVP) and tricyclic drugs reduce the number of wet nights by 1 to 2 per week during treatment, although the effect is not sustained after treatment is finished (SOR: A, based on a SR of homogeneous RCTs). Dry bed training with an alarm results in an additional reduction of wet nights over alarms alone (SOR: A, based on a systematic review of homogeneous RCTs].eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3337eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2005 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 54, no. 10 (October 2005)eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectcongenital defecteng
dc.subjectenuresis alarmseng
dc.subjectcentral nervous system defecteng
dc.subjecttricyclic drugseng
dc.subject.lcshPediatric urologyeng
dc.titleWhat is the best treatment for nocturnal enuresis in children?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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