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dc.contributor.authorKerns, J. Williameng
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Andyeng
dc.contributor.authorNashelsky, Joaneng
dc.date.issued2006-03eng
dc.description.abstractTricyclic antidepressants and intensive multidisciplinary programs are moderately effective for reducing chronic back pain; tricyclics are also effective for diabetic neuropathy and irritable bowel syndrome (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, meta-analyses and multiple small randomized controlled trials). Cognitive therapies are modestly effective for reducing pain in the following: chronic back pain, other chronic musculoskeletal disorders including rheumatoid arthritis (SOR: B, multiple meta-analyses with significant heterogeneity), and for chronic cancer pain (SOR: B, 1 meta-analysis of various quality studies).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 55(3) 2006: 235-236.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3423eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2006 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectpain reliefeng
dc.subjectcognitive therapieseng
dc.subjectantidepressantseng
dc.subject.lcshIntractable pain -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshPsychiatryeng
dc.subject.lcshChronic paineng
dc.subject.lcshAntidepressantseng
dc.subject.lcshCognitive therapyeng
dc.titleDoes psychiatric treatment help patients with intractable chronic pain?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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