[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEverts-Boehm, Danaeng
dc.coverage.spatialMissouri -- Ozarkeng
dc.date.issued1996eng
dc.description.abstractGigging - the practice of using a steel object in the shape of a large fork to impale fish - has long been a popular traditional activity in the Missouri Ozarks. Many natives of the area consider gigging to be their sport, despite several attempts to have the practice banned. Paul Martin has made his living as a gigmaker, and he is profiled here. Many giggers also use johnboats - six foot long wooden boats. Johnboat builder Cecil Murray is profiled.eng
dc.identifier.citationMissouri Folk Arts Program, 1996eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3453eng
dc.publisherMissouri Folk Arts Programeng
dc.relation.ispartofMissouri Folk Arts Program publications (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Arts and Sciences. Museum of Art and Archaeology. Missouri Folk Arts programeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMissouri Masters and Their Traditional Arts;eng
dc.source.urihttp://maa.missouri.edu/mfap/articles/ozark.pdfeng
dc.subjectgigeng
dc.subjectozarkseng
dc.subjectjohnboateng
dc.subject.lcshFolk arteng
dc.subject.lcshFlatboatseng
dc.subject.lcshRiverseng
dc.subject.lcshFishingeng
dc.titleBuildin' Boats, Giggin' and Foolin' Around is All Fun: Traditional Material Culture of the Ozark Waterwayseng
dc.typeArticleeng


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record