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dc.contributor.authorHolt, Jameseng
dc.contributor.authorWarren, Larryeng
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Rickeng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.description.abstractInterventions that include a combination of behavioral and lifestyle modification -- including decreased caloric intake, specific aids to changing diet, increased physical activity, and treatment of binge eating disorders -- have modest benefit with appropriate use (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, based on multiple randomized controlled trials). Hypnosis can be used as an adjunct to behavioral therapy for weight loss (SOR: A, based on systematic reviews).eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3502eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2006 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 55, no. 06 (June 2006): 536-538eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjecteating disorderseng
dc.subjectphysical activityeng
dc.subjectdietary changeseng
dc.subjecthypnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshObesityeng
dc.subject.lcshDiet therapyeng
dc.subject.lcshReducing dietseng
dc.subject.lcshWeight losseng
dc.subject.lcshBehavior therapyeng
dc.subject.lcshEating disorderseng
dc.titleWhat behavioral interventions are safe and effective for treating obesity?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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