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dc.contributor.authorPreston, Jeffreyeng
dc.contributor.authorCucuzzella, Markeng
dc.contributor.authorJamieson, Barbaraeng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.description.abstractInhaled short-acting beta-agonists (SABAs) are most effective in preventing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, followed by inhaled mast cell stabilizers and anticholinergic agents (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, multiple randomized control trials [RCTs]). Less evidence supports the use of leukotriene antagonists and inhaled corticosteroids, either individually or in combination (SOR: B). Underlying asthma, which commonly contributes to exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, should be diagnosed and controlled first (SOR: C).eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3504eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2006 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 55, no. 07 (July 2006): 631-633eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectmast cell stabilizerseng
dc.subjectanticholinergic agentseng
dc.subjectshort-acting beta-agonists (SABAs)eng
dc.subjectcorticosteroidseng
dc.subject.lcshParasympatholytic agentseng
dc.subject.lcshAsthma in childreneng
dc.subject.lcshAdrenocortical hormoneseng
dc.subject.lcshRespiratory therapyeng
dc.subject.lcshAdrenergic beta agonistseng
dc.titleWhat best prevents exercise-induced bronchoconstriction for a child with asthma?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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