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dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Pauleng
dc.contributor.authorPaden, Shelley L.eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.description.abstractLow-carbohydrate diets raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels by approximately 10%; soy protein with isoflavones raises HDL by 3% (strength of recommendation [SOR]: C, based on meta-analysis of physiologic parameters). The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and multivitamin supplementation raise HDL 21% to 33% (SOR: C, based on single randomized trial each measuring physiologic parameters). No other dietary interventions studied raise HDL (SOR: C, based on meta-analysis of physiologic parameters).eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3509eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2006 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 55, no. 12 (December 2006): 1076-1078eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectcarbohydrateseng
dc.subjectDietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)eng
dc.subjectisoflavoneseng
dc.subject.lcshHigh density lipoproteinseng
dc.subject.lcshDiet therapyeng
dc.subject.lcshCarbohydrateseng
dc.subject.lcshIsoflavones -- Therapeutic useeng
dc.subject.lcshVitamin therapyeng
dc.titleWhat is the dietary treatment for low HDL cholesterol?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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