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dc.contributor.authorSobelman, Stacey L.eng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.description.abstractThough contemporary fiction has evolved significantly alongside the social and political revolutions of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, there remains the tendency to return to the stigmatized classifications of literature in the past, especially in regards to contemporary female authors. Is a story feminist simply because it has been written by a woman, about a woman, and for a female audience? This used to be the definition of feminist literature, but in the twenty-first century, this broad definition becomes a scarlet letter that can trivialize the work of female authors. Evolution is therefore necessary to a full understanding of these works. I will examine the work and words of my contemporaries to address the stigmas associated with the work of a female author. Through an analysis of my own collection, I hope to prove that there must be more involved in a critique of an author's work than her gender.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/35296eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2013 Spring theseseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Arts and Sciences. Department of English.eng
dc.subjectcontemporary fictioneng
dc.subjectfeminist undertoneseng
dc.subjectgender issueseng
dc.subject.lcshWomen authorseng
dc.subject.lcshFeminist literatureeng
dc.subject.lcshAuthorship in literatureeng
dc.subject.lcshCriticismeng
dc.titleBroadening the scope: female authors are for more than the 'F-word'eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelBachelorseng
thesis.degree.nameB.A.eng


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