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dc.contributor.advisorBradley, Kevin W. (Kevin Wayne), 1973-eng
dc.contributor.authorSather, Bryan C.eng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 30, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Kevin W. Bradleyeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.description"May 2012"eng
dc.description.abstractOne weed that is of concern in Missouri pastures that can be detrimental is Northern dewberry (Rubus flagellaris Willd.). This weed can be detrimental due its production of spines which can injure grazing animals and also humans. Results from our study show that herbicide applications made in the fall that contain metsulfuron will provide approximately 50% control of this weed, but where severe infestations exist a follow-up application will be required. Tall fescue can also be detrimental to the health of grazing animals. It can contain a fungus known as ergovaline which is in its highest concentration in tall fescue seedheads. Applying herbicides at certain growth stages can reduce tall fescue seedhead density. Applications of metsulfuron-containing herbicides at the boot stage of growth reduced tall fescue seedhead density the most compared to vegetative stage applications of these same herbicides. The distribution of cattle grazing in mixed tall fescue and legume pastures is also an important aspect of pasture management. Overgrazing of certain areas in pastures can cause an increase in weed growth and also reduce the growth of desirable forage. However, many producers are skeptical of treating pastures with broadcast herbicide applications as almost all herbicides available for broadleaf weed control in a pasture setting will eliminate other desirable forage species such as clover. Through this research, it was determined that even with the elimination of legumes, cattle grazing distribution can be increased in herbicide-treated pastures compared to non-treated areas within the same pasture.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 90 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/35415
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subjectmetsulfuroneng
dc.subjectweed managementeng
dc.subjectpasture managementeng
dc.subjectcattle grazingeng
dc.titleInfluence of herbicides application on weed and tall fescue management and grazing distribution in Missouri pastureseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant, insect and microbial sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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