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dc.contributor.advisorGrant, Sheila Anneng
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Carrieeng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2012 Theseseng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on May 30, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Sheila Granteng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological engineering.eng
dc.description"May 2012"eng
dc.description.abstractUncontrollable hemorrhage is significant cause of preventable death in the military and civilian setting. Hemostatic wound dressings have been created in an attempt to rectify this problem, but none currently on the market are highly effective at controlling hemorrhage resulting in a need for an effective hemostatic wound dressing. This study investigated the effects of gold, silver, and silica nanoparticles on blood coagulation time in order to determine if nanoparticle incorporation into a hemostatic wound dressing would effectively achieve hemostasis. Gold, silver, and silica nanoparticles were experimented with two different ex vivo studies to determine their effects on coagulation. A modified Lee White Method and a rotational viscometer were utilized to assess the nanoparticles ability to clot blood. Results obtained from the modified Lee White Method proved inconsistent and inconclusive demonstrating a need for improved testing methods. Results acquired from viscometer testing demonstrated that silica was effective in decreasing coagulation time indicating its potential use as a hemostatic agent and its prospective incorporation into a hemostatic wound dressing.eng
dc.format.extentx, 68 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/35417eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subjecthemostatic wound dressingeng
dc.subjectnanoparticleseng
dc.subjectcoagulation timeeng
dc.titleEfficacy of nanoparticles in achieving hemostasiseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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