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dc.contributor.advisorMerrill, Denniseng
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Erik A.eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.coverage.spatialLatin Americaeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page, viewed on May 30, 2013eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dennis Merrilleng
dc.descriptionVitaeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographic references (pages 114-119)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Dept. of History. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2013eng
dc.description.abstractDuring the first decade of the twentieth century, U.S. Secretary of State, Elihu Root, used international law as mode of contact and communication in which he could persuasively present U.S. cultural values in terms of social, political, and economic expectations as a way of creating change within Latin American societies. This represented a less intrusive and seemingly more respectful way of exerting influence in the region all for the purpose of addressing Washington's concerns with national security and economic stability. Though the United States, as expressed by Root, articulated certain moral and ethical principles of conduct in foreign relations and invited Latin America to adopt those principles, the true focus and concern within international law from the U.S. perspective was creating a world in which U.S. political and economic interests could thrive. As adopted and deployed by Elihu Root, international law projected certain cultural constructions that defined America's understanding of civilization, which had the effect of creating more rigid boundaries of separation among nations. America's definition and application of civilization to foreign affairs installed further support for intervention by the United States when Latin American nations did not satisfy the cultural expectations of the United States. Constructions of gender and race within international law laid a foundation for scientific and political inequality among nations while also establishing basic expectations for behavior. Root's civilization expected nations to act with manly strength and self-mastery in all things, especially in resolving disputes and satisfying financial obligations. Failure to meet those preconditions to civilization signified an uncivilized and racially inferior nation in need of the civilizing paternalism of the United States. The legal discourse within international law that Root stimulated produced mixed responses and results. Politicians like Luis Drago of Argentina communicated within the legal forum to assert an independent Latin American identity under the law. Yet this same ruling class of elites to which Drago belonged communicated their support for those legal principles articulated by Secretary Root when that ruling class could advance their domestic programs of economic development and policies based on racial superiority.eng
dc.description.tableofcontentsRoutes to empire -- Imperial international law -- Laws of culture -- Conclusioneng
dc.format.extentvii, 121 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/35418eng
dc.subject.lcshRoot, Elihu, 1845-1937 -- Influenceeng
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Foreign relations -- Latin Americaeng
dc.subject.lcshInternational laweng
dc.subject.lcshInternational relations and cultureeng
dc.subject.lcshLatin America -- Foreign relations -- United Stateseng
dc.subject.otherThesis -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Historyeng
dc.titleLegal empire: international law and culture in U.S.-Latin American relationseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (UMKC)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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