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dc.contributor.advisorWahlman, Maudeeng
dc.contributor.authorClifton-James, Licia E.eng
dc.contributor.sponsorArt and Art History
dc.coverage.spatialAfricaeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page, viewed on May 31, 2013eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Maude Southwell Wahlmaneng
dc.descriptionVitaeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographic references (pages 107-110)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Dept. of Art and Art History. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2013eng
dc.description.abstractMany African and African America artists have chosen to represent Nsibidi and other African and Afro-Caribbean syllabaries in their works of art. However, some artists also produces art and script given to them "by God" with the intent of carrying out God's will and helping others? J.B. Murray believed this to be his situation. Through a thorough investigation of the history of the scripts and forms of Africa and the writing systems that developed in the Americas from those African scripts, the diasporic path that African traditions took in the Americas, will be explored. One of the challenges of this research has been the different perceptions expressed by Western and non-Western viewpoints. Through an analysis of several critical viewpoints, including sociological, anthropological, and art historical, these Western and non-Western viewpoints are critiqued in connection with the continuation of African traditions throughout the diaspora. Another area examined is the difference between knowing and choosing to use the scripts and forms of Africa to express a connection with that culture, such as the artists Betye Saar and Victor Ekpuk, and simply producing art, folkart, or script, and not knowing there is any connection between their work and the work of others, whether in other countries or their own. J.B. Murray is a wonderful artist to examine, due to the fact that he had no preconceived notions of African art, traditions, or customs. He was illiterate and therefore had no opportunity to read and gain knowledge of other cultures. Until he had produced his script and forms for a few years and gained notoriety with exposure to art institutions in the United States, he had no idea the messages going to his recipients through him, from God, had any connection to any other cultures.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of Arts and Sciences
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- History of African script and spirit forms and their migration to the New World -- Analysis of Murray's artistry and its reception -- Comparison of the use of scripts and forms by Murray and other artists -- Conclusions -- Illustrationseng
dc.description.versionmonographic
dc.format.extentxiv, 112 pageseng
dc.format.mediumtext
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/35459eng
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.isversionofVersion of record
dc.rightsOpen Access (fully available)
dc.rights.holderCopyright retained by author
dc.subject.lcshMurry, J. B. (John B.), 1908-1988eng
dc.subject.lcshWriting -- Africaeng
dc.subject.lcshSpirituality in arteng
dc.subject.otherThesis -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Art and art historyeng
dc.titleMaking the connection: J.B. Murray and the scripts and forms of Africaeng
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.genreGraduate
thesis.degree.disciplineArt and Art History (UMKC)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameMA (Master of Arts)eng


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