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dc.contributor.authorKelsberg, Garyeng
dc.contributor.authorBishop, Racheleng
dc.contributor.authorMorton, Jacquelyn R.eng
dc.date.issued2006-04eng
dc.description.abstractInfants with an undescended testis should be referred between ages 6 and 15 months, since almost all who experience spontaneous descent do so by 6 months (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, extrapolation from cohort studies). The incidence of germ cell aplasia in undescended testes begins to rise at 15 months (SOR: C, extrapolation of observational studies); however, evidence is inconclusive that orchiopexy at this age results in higher rates of paternity success (SOR: B, retrospective cohort study). Orchiopexy may allow earlier detection of testicular tumors (SOR: C, expert opinion), but it has not been shown to reduce the risk of testicular cancer (SOR: B, retrospective cohort study) or improve 5-year survival rates for those patients diagnosed with testicular cancer (SOR: B, retrospective cohort study).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 55(4) 2006: 336-337.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3587eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2006 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.subjectorchiopexyeng
dc.subjectcancer riskeng
dc.subjectgerm cell aplasiaeng
dc.subject.lcshurologisteng
dc.subject.lcshCryptorchidismeng
dc.titleWhen should a child with an undescended testis be referred to a urologist?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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