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dc.contributor.authorSheridan, Edwardeng
dc.contributor.authorLudwig, Jennifereng
dc.contributor.authorHelmen, Jennifereng
dc.date.issued2007-03eng
dc.description.abstractAlthough no studies specifically evaluate this question, treatment for Group A beta- hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis without laboratory confirmation in the general population is not advisable (strength of recommendation [SOR]: C, based on consensus guidelines) due to poor diagnostic accuracy. When you suspect GABHS pharyngitis either clinically or epidemio-logically, confirm the diagnosis of pharyngitis by a laboratory test. Patients with a positive throat culture or a rapid antigen detection test should receive appropriate treatment with antimicrobial therapy (SOR: A, based on clinical trials).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 56(3) 2007: 234-235.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3628eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2007 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectdiagnostic accuracyeng
dc.subjectstreptococcuseng
dc.subjectpharyngitiseng
dc.subject.lcshPharyngitiseng
dc.subject.lcshStreptococcal infections -- Diagnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshChildren -- Diseases -- Diagnosiseng
dc.titleShould you treat a symptomatic patient by phone when his child has confirmed strep throat?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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