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dc.contributor.authorKalish, Virginia B.eng
dc.contributor.authorLoven, Bridgeteng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.description.abstractThere is no one best evidence-based treatment for chronic constipation in the elderly. While the most common first-line treatments are dietary fiber and exercise, the evidence is insufficient to support this approach in the geriatric population (strength of recommendation [SOR]: for dietary fiber: A, based on a systematic review; for exercise: SOR: B, based on 1 good- and 1 fair-quality randomized controlled trial [RCT]). Herbal supplements (such as aloe), alternative treatments (biofeedback), lubricants (mineral oil), and combination laxatives sold in the US have not been sufficiently studied in controlled trials to make a recommendation (SOR: A, based on systematic review).eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3656eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2007 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 56, no. 12 (December 2007): 1050-1052eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectdietary fibereng
dc.subjectbowel movementeng
dc.subjectgeriatric populationeng
dc.subject.lcshConstipation in old age -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshLaxatives -- Therapeutic use -- Effectivenesseng
dc.subject.lcshFiber in human nutritioneng
dc.titleWhat is the best treatment for chronic constipation in the elderly?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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