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dc.contributor.advisorFriend, Jennifer Ingrideng
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Julie Annetteeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page, viewed on August 13, 2013eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Jennifer Friendeng
dc.descriptionVitaeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographic references (pages 239-277)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed. D.)--School of Education. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2013eng
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this narrative bounded case study research was to describe the different perspectives of five struggling readers regarding contributing factors to their literacy experiences and success. The theoretical framework used to make meaning included: (a) high schools and literacy, (b) school culture, (c) motivation, (d) technology, and (e) literacy as the gateway of life. The qualitative case study methodology provided an in-depth investigation into each case, where the perceptions of the individuals were explored for a deeper understanding of the experiences each participant had with literacy during their three years at one Midwestern high school. Five case studies were drawn from the initial larger sample of 15 participants identified through a criterion sampling process. The overarching question that guided this study was: What perceptions do the participants have in regards to their literacy success? With the following research questions helping to guide this study: 1. What perceptions do the participants have in regards to how the literacy strategies their teachers used in their high school classes affected their experiences? 2. What strategies or situations outside of school have influenced or affected the students' experiences with literacy? 3. What are student recommendations for teachers to help their students improve their literacy? 4. What can students pursue outside of school to help with their literacy? Official achievement data, narratives, and interviews were utilized for data collection and analysis. The most significant findings of this study were the similarities in how the participants described their personal literacy experiences. All of the participants shared similar perceptions in regards to their self-image, their successes and achievements, their struggles and the degree to which they attributed their literacy success to their teachers. It was evident that all of the participants depended heavily on their teachers for their success. The dependence on their teachers was evident as the participants sought one-on-one assistance with their teachers outside of class when they did not understand the concepts or text during class. While all of these participants struggled with literacy they also were able to find success by graduating on time and with GPAs that were a 2.5 or higher.eng
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- Literature review -- Methodology -- Findings -- Results -- Appendix A. Narrative consent form -- Appendix B. Writing prompt -- Appendix C. Interview consent form -- Appendix D. Interview protocol -- Appendix E. In-depth coding analysis per participanteng
dc.format.extentx, 279 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/36952eng
dc.subject.lcshReading (Secondary) -- Case studieseng
dc.subject.lcshStudents -- Attitudeseng
dc.subject.otherDissertation -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Educationeng
dc.titleLiteracy in the 21st Century: supporting struggling adolescent readerseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducation (UMKC)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.eng


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