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dc.contributor.advisorKerns, John Gerald, 1971-eng
dc.contributor.authorDocherty, Anna R.eng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2013 Dissertationseng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 27, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. John G. Kernseng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstractThere is growing evidence that anhedonia--the extent to which an individual reports pleasure or interest in social and physical stimuli--is important to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. At the same time, some research has suggested that there are different facets of pleasure and positive affect (PA), such as liking vs. wanting (Berridge & Robinson, 1998). Previous research has not directly examined the relationship between anhedonia symptoms and measures of positive affect in relation to genetic liability to schizophrenia. This research examined people with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, their first-degree relatives, and nonpsychiatric controls to assess emotion traits as potential phenotypes for anhedonia in genetic liability for schizophrenia. Multiple methods and measures were used to assess anhedonia and affective traits. There was a general lack of association between interview anhedonia and many facets of PA, coupled with a lack of group differences across PA variables. However, there was general evidence of association of self-reported anhedonia (in both probands and relatives) with many PA variables, suggesting the presence of confounding methodological variance. Significant group differences on a novel behavioral measure of effort for reward were detected. Last, results suggested that ambivalence, long considered relevant to psychosis, is more associated with affect than with liability to schizophrenia.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 108 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc870871412eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/37606
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/37606eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2013 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.subjectschizophreniaeng
dc.subjectanhedoniaeng
dc.subjectpathophysiologyeng
dc.subjectgenetic liabilityeng
dc.titleAnhedonia and deficits in positive emotional experience in individuals with genetic liability for schizophreniaeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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