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dc.contributor.advisorMori, Anatole, 1960-eng
dc.contributor.authorKaloudis, Naomi Rutheng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 3, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Anatole Morieng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Classical studies.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] My research examines the cultural significance of Theocritus' pastoral Idylls as imitations of folk songs, a genre traditionally passed down orally. I explore how elements of folk-lyric in the pastorals invest the fictional pastoral pharmakon (“remedy”) with a sense of vivid realism. I use the mythical characters to demonstrate how the audience may receive the pharmakon upon hearing a recitation of the Idylls. The Alexandrian Greek population felt disconnected from their homeland, and the main goal of the Ptolemies was the preservation of Greek heritage. As the pastoral characters listen to song in order to find “peace of mind,” the cosmopolitan Alexandrian audience would listen and be projected to old world Greece. Theocritus' verbal lyricism suggests an awareness of contemporary euphonist theory. The main goal of the third-century euphonist scholars who commented on the aesthetic appeal of archaic and classical oral compositions was the discussion of beautiful sound in poetry, its euphony. Theocritus' verbal lyricism simulates the performance of earlier, musical traditions, and, moreover, Theocritus, as well as other Hellenistic poets, was as attentive to the sound of his text as a composer would be to a musical score. My research views literary works as textual performances.eng
dc.format.extentiv, 259 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872588583eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/37835
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/37835eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjecteuphonist theoryeng
dc.subjectpastoral poetryeng
dc.subjectGreek folksongseng
dc.subjectHellenistic literatureeng
dc.titleRestoring tradition: verbal lyricism and therapeutic song in Theocritus' pastoral Idyllseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineClassical studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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