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dc.contributor.authorSharma, Bikaseng
dc.contributor.authorMisicko, Nancy E.eng
dc.contributor.authorHitchcock, Kristineng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.description.abstractPatients with unexplained asymptomatic true hypercalcemia should be screened for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and malignancy using an intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) level by immunoradioassay (SOR: C, expert opinion). Other recommended tests that can distinguish PHPT from malignancy and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, as well as help manage patients with PHPT include urinary 24-hour calcium and creatinine levels, parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTHrP), alkaline phosphatase, calcitriol, and bone densitometry (SOR: C, expert opinion).eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3786eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2008 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 57, no. 04 (April 2008): 267+.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectserum calcium leveleng
dc.subjectserum albumin leveleng
dc.subjectrenal failureeng
dc.subjectendocrine disordereng
dc.subject.lcshHypercalcemia -- Diagnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshCalcium -- Metabolism -- Disorderseng
dc.subject.lcshHyperparathyroidismeng
dc.titleHow should you evaluate elevated calcium in an asymptomatic patient?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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