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dc.contributor.advisorThorson, Esthereng
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, Jodi McFarlandeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 9, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Esther L. Thorsoneng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstractWhile other research has focused on the effect that online commenting can have on news sites, little has addressed the reasons that online commenters participate, the needs that online commenting behavior meets and the emotions that commenters experience. Understanding online commenters is key to unlocking the reasons for their engagement. As news sites seek deeper connections with their audience, knowledge of those who contribute comments to the site is useful in understanding how to build loyalty. Uses & Gratifications Theory applied to online commenting culture provides key insights into the how, why and who of online news commenters. This qualitative research explores those questions among a selection of online commenters who agreed, anonymously, to answer online questionnaires. The commenters in this study were driven by the need for information/surveillance, with more than half requiring the news every day, as well as a desire for social interaction, exploration of personal identity and a desire for diversion. They have a high need for information. They feel informed and connected, along with powerful and angry, more than any other emotions when commenting. They feel more positive emotions than negative emotions. The act of commenting and engaging on the site feeds their sense of connectedness to the world.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 116 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/37937
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subjectonline commentingeng
dc.subjectreader engagementeng
dc.subjectonline newseng
dc.titleUses & gratifications theory in online commenter cultureeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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