[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Judith C. (Judith Claire), 1958-eng
dc.contributor.authorGrelle, Lisaeng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2013 Theseseng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 9, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; and a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf fileeng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Judith Goodmaneng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.H.S. University of Missouri-Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- communication science & disorders.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstractAutism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a group of developmental disabilities that cause mild to severe deficits in language, verbal and nonverbal communication, and social skills (Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, 2004). Given the social nature of conversation and the deficits in social skills seen in ASD, one might expect the development of conversation to be more delayed than other language deficits. Previous research on typically developing children has shown that differences in maternal utterances and conversational structure alter the nature of interactions in ways that appear to affect children's acquisition of language. The present study investigates the maternal pragmatic and conversational input to children with ASD, particularly the types of utterances (i.e., questions and commands) and the conversational structure produced. The children's responses to the mothers' questions and commands were also examined. Mothers of children with ASD produced significantly more commands than mothers of typically developing children matched by age or language level. The structure of mothers' conversational input also varied by group: mothers of children with ASD produced significantly more topic continuations than mothers of age-matched children. The results contribute to our knowledge of maternal language input to children with ASD.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 38 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/37939
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2013 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subjectautism spectrum disorderseng
dc.subjectmaternal conversational structureeng
dc.subjectlanguage acquisitioneng
dc.titleMothers' conversational patterns: a comparison between typically developing children and young children with autism spectrum disorderseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication science and disorders (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.H.S.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record