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dc.contributor.advisorCowan, Nelsoneng
dc.contributor.authorHardman, Kyleeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 9, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Nelson Cowaneng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstractVisual working memory stores stimuli from our environment as representations that can be accessed by high-level control processes. This study addresses a longstanding debate in the literature about whether storage limits in visual working memory include a limit to the complexity of discrete items. We examined the issue with a number of change-detection experiments that used complex stimuli which possessed multiple features per stimulus item. Some past research that used the same methodology as our experiments found that detection of changes in stimuli was unaffected by how many features of the items participants were required to remember (Luck and Vogel, 1997). However, in none of our eight experiments were we able to replicate that result and instead found that participants were less able to detect changes when they were required to remember more features of the items. We were unable to support the notion that items with multiple relevant features can be processed by visual working memory without loss.eng
dc.format.extentx, 67 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/37944
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subjectworking memoryeng
dc.subjectfeature bindingeng
dc.subjectreplicationeng
dc.subjectchange dectectioneng
dc.titleRemembering complex objects in visual working memoryeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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