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dc.contributor.authorCollins, Margareteng
dc.contributor.authorKelsberg, Garyeng
dc.contributor.authorSafranek, Saraheng
dc.date.issued2008-05eng
dc.description.abstractNo studies demonstrate that training patients to examine their skin decreases mortality from melanoma in the general population. Nor is there any evidence to suggest that teaching patients to monitor their skin for suspicious lesions results in earlier detection of melanoma, better prognosis at diagnosis, or better clinical outcomes. However, patients who have had melanoma and perform self-examination have a lower risk of death from subsequent occurrences than those who do not (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, based on a case-control study).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 57(5) 2008: 336-337.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3794eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2008 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectskin cancereng
dc.subjectcancer screeningeng
dc.subjectmetastaseseng
dc.subject.lcshSelf-examination, Medicaleng
dc.subject.lcshSkin -- Examinationeng
dc.subject.lcshMelanoma -- Diagnosiseng
dc.titleIs training patients in self-examination an effective way to screen for melanoma?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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