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dc.contributor.advisorVaught, David R.eng
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Alexandereng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2013 Theseseng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 11, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. David Vaughteng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Parks, recreation, and tourism.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstractFlow is a state that occurs when the challenge of an activity and the skill level of the participant are in unison. This term has also been called “optimal experience” or “being in the zone” (Csikszentmihalyi, 1997). However, even a slight increase in challenge past one's skill level can produce greater levels of enjoyment in any certain activity in which we engage (Csikszentmihalyi,1999; Pearce, Ainley & Howard, 2005). This study was an attempt to add a slight increase in challenge of trail users at Katy Trail State Park (KTSP). Through contiguous signage, or the content of one sign leading to the next, placed along the side of the trail, users were asked to recall the content upon their return from their trail walk via on-site questionnaire. The challenge, though non-physical, was an attempt to increase enjoyment in comparison to trail users without this signage in place. While mostly the enjoyment levels were largely homogenous, a few results did show some significance. Some users were found to be more “engrossed” or felt it “meant a lot” for them to be on the trail during the days of data collection. The exploratory nature of this study did net some results that could be useful in laying the foundation for future academic study in place attachment, enjoyment or motivation and provides some caveats for further study of enjoyment.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 77 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/37972
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2013 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subjecttrail userseng
dc.subjectcontiguous signageeng
dc.subjectenjoyment leveleng
dc.subjectplace attachmenteng
dc.titleEnjoyment of trails: a flow-based study of contiguous signage recalleng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineParks, recreation and tourism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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