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dc.contributor.advisorKesler, Dylan C.eng
dc.contributor.advisorThompson, Frank R. (Frank Richard)eng
dc.contributor.authorStanton, Richard A., Jr.eng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2013 Theseseng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 12, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisors: Dr. Dylan C. Kesler, Frank R. Thompson III, Ph.D.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia, 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Fisheries and wildlife sciences.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstractResources shape the movements and space use of birds. In turn, birds differ in their relative fitness, in part as a consequence of movement and space use decisions. The saga of each individual plays out across time and space, generating the dynamic pattern known as a species' geographic range. Then, changes in geographic range dimensions alter the selective environment encountered by individuals, potentially driving evolutionary change in movement modes. Thus, understanding resource selection requires knowledge of both individual behavior and landscape patterns of patch occupancy. This thesis describes resource selection from both perspectives. We conducted two concurrent studies in a cooperatively breeding bird (Brown-headed Nuthatches, Sitta pusilla). We radio-tracked 22 Brown-headed Nuthatches, and related their space use to available resources within their respective home ranges. These associations controlled for the influence of the nest site as a central place; thus use of these resources reflected their perceived value to nuthatches. Areas of high use were associated with recently-killed trees, recent prescribed fire, pine dominance, and grassy herbaceous cover in descending order of importance. We also modeled patch occupancy across a range extension front created by habitat restoration. We found that high quality habitat near the range limit was vacant while marginal habitat was occupied, contrary to the standard model of range extension wherein habitats are occupied in order of quality. The pattern we observed is consistent with a range extension front that has been shaped by constraints on effective dispersal. This pattern may be quite common among birds given that many species are sedentary and that long-distance dispersers may have lower survival or fail to reproduce.eng
dc.format.extentxv, 80 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/38390
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2013 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subjecthabitat selectioneng
dc.subjectrange extensioneng
dc.subjectclimate change adaptationeng
dc.subjectprescribed fireeng
dc.titleHabitat selection of brown-headed nuthatches at multiple spatial scaleseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and wildlife sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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