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dc.contributor.advisorLarsen, David R. (David Rolf)eng
dc.contributor.authorStevens, Joshua Hauckeng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2013 Theseseng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 12, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. David Larseneng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Forestry.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstractSugar maple importance has been increasing in Missouri's forest for the previous several decades. Managers have little information to guide them with selecting silviculture treatments for managing this increasingly important species. I examined the effects that soil water, soil nutrients, and landscape position have upon the abundance and height growth rates of sugar maple, white oak, and northern red oak in young even-aged, 5-29-year old, forests of central and east central Missouri in the lower Missouri and lower Osage River valleys. Relationships were examined in plots samples in 44 stands through examination of the soil profile, individual tree characteristics and stand characteristics at 44 sites. The data and analysis showed that sugar maple abundance is positively correlated with soil base saturation and height growth rate is positively correlated with AWC. White oak abundance was negatively correlated to soil base saturation. Northern red oak abundance occurred over a range of sites and no trends were observed with the measured factors. White and northern red oak growth rates were each negatively correlated with soil pH. The data from this study suggested that sugar maple is most competitive with more shade intolerant oaks on fertile sites with a mesic moisture regime.eng
dc.format.extentx, 91 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/38391eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2013 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subjectsoil chemistryeng
dc.subjectsite productivityeng
dc.subjectoak treeseng
dc.subjectmaple treeseng
dc.subjectsilviculture treatmentseng
dc.titleSite quality factors affecting Acer saccharum, Quercus rubra and Quercus alba abundance and height growth rates in young even-aged stands located in central Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineForestry (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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