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dc.contributor.advisorRouder, Jeffrey Neil, 1966-eng
dc.contributor.authorSwagman, April R.eng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 12, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Jeffrey N. Roudereng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstractCognitive psychologists often debate whether cognitive processes such as recognition memory and visual perception are better described as continuous or discrete. Much of the literature is dominated by continuous latent-strength models such as signal detection theory. Here the author sought to test the effectiveness of discrete-state models at predicting performance on cognitive tasks. Thirty-nine participants completed Experiment 1, which analyzed recognition memory and visual word identification performance in two-alternative forced choice tasks. Fifty participants completed Experiment 2, which focused on word identifi cation in both two-choice and one-choice designs. Data were analyzed via maximum likelihood estimation for comparable discrete-state and latent-strength models for all participants. The discrete-state models outperformed latent-strength models for the majority of participants in both tasks of both experiments. Evidence for discrete states was especially strong in two-choice word identification tasks. The results indicate that discrete-state models should not be ignored in cognitive processing, as they provide a good account of data in recognition memory and word identification tasks.eng
dc.format.extentix, 58 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/38395
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subjectrecognition memoryeng
dc.subjectword identificationeng
dc.subjectdiscrete stateeng
dc.subjectlatent-strength modeleng
dc.titleExploring the structure of cognitive processes: discrete and continuous theories of memory and perceptioneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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