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dc.contributor.authorGuirguis-Blake, Janelleeng
dc.contributor.authorWright, Andreweng
dc.contributor.authorRich, Joanneeng
dc.date.issued2008-05eng
dc.description.abstractSelective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appear to be the safest, given current data. Major safety concerns—prompting a US Food and Drug administration (FDA) black box label warning—have been raised about increased risk of suicidality (ideation, behavior, and attempts) among adolescents receiving antidepressant therapy. Information about the safety of tricyclic antidepressants in young people is limited because adverse effects have not been systematically reported in trials (SOR: A, meta-analysis).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 57(5) 2008: 327+eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3841eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2008 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectselective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)eng
dc.subjectsafety concernseng
dc.subjectsuicide precautionseng
dc.subject.lcshDepression in adolescenceeng
dc.subject.lcshAntidepressants -- Effectivenesseng
dc.subject.lcshTeenagers -- Suicidal behavior -- Preventioneng
dc.titleWhich drugs are safest for moderate to severe depression in adolescents?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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