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dc.contributor.authorNusser, John A.eng
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Elleneng
dc.date.issued2008-02eng
dc.description.abstractJaw claudication, diplopia, or a temporal artery abnormality on physical exam increase the likelihood of temporal arteritis. A finding of thrombocytosis in a patient with suspected temporal arteritis moderately increases the likelihood of this diagnosis (strength of recommendation: B, based on systematic reviews of retrospective cohort studies). Patients with temporal arteritis frequently complain of headaches, and often have mildly abnormal erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR), but neither of these findings helps in the diagnosis.eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 57(2) 2008: 119-120.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3842eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2008 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectthrombocytosiseng
dc.subjecttemporal artery biopsyeng
dc.subjectjaw claudicationeng
dc.subject.lcshGiant cell arteritiseng
dc.subject.lcshDiplopiaeng
dc.subject.lcshIntermittent claudicationeng
dc.titleWhich clinical features and lab findings increase the likelihood of temporal arteritis?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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