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dc.contributor.advisorKelley, Dennis F.eng
dc.contributor.authorHartleip, Jill Elizabetheng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 18, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Dennis Kelleyeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Religious studies.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This research looks at why different psychointegrators, in different geographic locations, in different cultures, are often all considered to be religious. In addition to the similar neurological environments that the various psychointegrators create, there are cultural similarities that may contribute to the consistency of all of the cultures attributing these experiences as being religious. Just as the set and setting determine the nature of a psychointegrator experience, set and setting determine the nature of any experience and its attribution as being religious. However, the psychointegrator also establishes a neurological setting that in conjunction with, while also affecting the established set, occasions the experiences attributed as having the entheogenic nature that often occurs with a psychointegrator. This is not to say that the ingestion of the substance is enough to cause a religious experience: the psychointegrator facilitates the experience that many deem to be religious. This investigation speaks to the nature of the religious experience and supports a definition of religion based upon set and setting. Experiences are deemed religious by the people who have them, then groups of people collaborate together to create religion; that there exist substances that contain the potential to facilitate this experience is quite significant in a world that is divided by religious differences.eng
dc.format.extentiv, 56 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/38592
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the University of Missouri - Columbia.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subjectpsychointegratoreng
dc.subjectneurological environmenteng
dc.subjectreligious experienceeng
dc.titleSet and setting: interrelated determinants for psychointegrator and religious experienceseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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