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dc.contributor.advisorPinhero, Patrick Josepheng
dc.contributor.authorNeth, Jacobeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 18, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Patrick Pinheroeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri-Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Chemical engineering.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Immiscible binary metallic systems impart a special scientific intrigue for researchers in thermodynamics and condensed matter. At equilibrium one might expect that the interfaces between each of the metallic components to be sharp and well-defined. This resembles a picture painted in undergraduate chemistry courses examining aqueous/organic phase separations. In binary metallic melts involving immiscible components much of the same is expected, especially in systems like Bi-Cu where the enthalpies of mixing are very endothermic, approaching 7000 J/mol. Solidus interactions are believed to be moot, but recent evidence has shown that Bi intercalates into the Cu microstructure inducing cracking after significant exposure. The objective of this thesis is to present the results of a study examining the effect of Bi and temperature on the fracture response of a Cu specimen. Both laboratory experiments and finite element modeling were used to better understand this phenomenon. Prior work has demonstrated the embrittlement of copper by the introduction of bismuth, even in dilute quantities. Furthermore it is commonly accepted that the embrittlement is a result of a faceting that occurs at the grain boundary. Although this phenomenon has been extensively observed it is not well understood. Duscher et al. studied this system and submitted that the embrittlement stems not only from the strain of a large impurity at the grain boundary, but also from a reduced hybridization between the d and s states of the copper atoms that surround the bismuth impurity. Additionally, it has been suggested by others that bismuth will intercalate into the grain boundaries of copper under certain conditions. This thesis presents a comprehensive parametric model of the effects of temperature and the presence of Bi on the fracture response of the sample. The experimental data provide an extensive matrix of conditions within a decreased ductility trough for Cu. Preferential faceting, surface science, and mechanical strength data are keys to understanding this bimetallic system.eng
dc.format.extentxi, 86 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/38595
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the University of Missouri - Columbia.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subjectfinite element modelingeng
dc.subjectcompact tensileeng
dc.subjectcopper bismutheng
dc.subjectintercalateeng
dc.titleBismuth impurity effects on copper: examining embrittlement in immiscible binary metallic systemseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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