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dc.contributor.authorBeard, J. Markeng
dc.contributor.authorSafranek, Saraheng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.description.abstractTopical or oral nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), corticosteroid injection, and acupuncture are more helpful than placebo in treating lateral epicondylitis, or tennis elbow (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, multiple systematic reviews of randomized, controlled trials [RCTs] of limited quality and individual RCTs). A corticosteroid injection is effective for short-term therapy--as long as 6 weeks--but produces no long-term improvement. Physiotherapy or a wait-and-see approach are superior to corticosteroid injection at 52 weeks (SOR: B, RCTs).eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3900eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2009 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 58, no. 03 (March 2009): 159+.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectepicondylitiseng
dc.subjectergonomic modificationseng
dc.subjectacupunctureeng
dc.subject.lcshTennis elbow -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshElbow -- Wounds and injuries -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshNonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents -- Effectivenesseng
dc.titleWhat treatment works best for tennis elbow?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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