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dc.contributor.authorMay, Todd J.eng
dc.contributor.authorSafranek, Saraheng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.description.abstractThere are no clinical or epidemiologic features that will help you to clearly distinguish community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections (CA-MRSA) from methicillin-sensitive (CA-MSSA) infections (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, prospective cohort studies). Incision and drainage is the primary therapy for purulent skin and soft tissue infections (SOR: B, randomized, controlled clinical trials [RCTs]). There are inadequate data evaluating the role of oral antibiotics for MRSA (SOR: B, single RCT).eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3906eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2009 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 58, no. 05 (May 2009): 276+.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectabscess formationeng
dc.subjectpurulent cellulitiseng
dc.subjectfluoroquinoloneseng
dc.subject.lcshStaphylococcus aureus infections -- Diagnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshStaphylococcus aureus infections -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshCellulitiseng
dc.subject.lcshAbscess -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshCommunicable diseases -- Diagnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshCommunicable diseases -- Treatmenteng
dc.titleWhen should you suspect community-acquired MRSA? How should you treat it?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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