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dc.contributor.authorHarris, John Brockeng
dc.contributor.authorEdgerton, Lisaeng
dc.contributor.authorStafford, Kareneng
dc.date.issued2009-11eng
dc.description.abstractAdults between the ages of 19 and 64 years who have chronic lung disease, including asthma, should get the vaccine, as should all patients 65 years and older (strength of recommendation [SOR]: C, consensus guide-lines). Evidence doesn't support routine vaccination of children with asthma or adults younger than 65 years who don't have chronic lung disease to decrease asthma-related or pneumonia-related hospitalizations (SOR: B, 1 retrospective cohort study and 1 retrospective, case- controlled cohort study).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 58(11) 2009: 611+ .eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3915eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2009 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectchronic lung diseaseeng
dc.subjectinvasive pneumococcal disease (IPD)eng
dc.subjectAdvisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)eng
dc.subject.lcshPneumococcal vaccineeng
dc.subject.lcshAsthma -- Complicationseng
dc.subject.lcshBacterial vaccines -- Effectivenesseng
dc.titleWhich asthma patients should get the pneumococcal vaccine?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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