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dc.contributor.authorFulhage, Charles Duaneeng
dc.contributor.authorPfost, Donald L.eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.description"Reviewed January 2009" -- Extension website.eng
dc.description.abstractA primary need and concern for most confinement livestock producers is managing manure so that groundwater and surface water are protected and regulatory requirements are fulfilled. This objective is usually accomplished by applying manure to the land in such a manner that the potential polluting nutrients (N, P, K and organic matter) are used by the soil-plant complex and are not allowed to enter the groundwater/surface water infrastructure.eng
dc.identifier.otherWQ-0311-2009eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3937
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri Extensioneng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Extensioneng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWQ - Water Quality Initiative (University of Missouri--Columbia. Extension) ; 0311eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.rights.licenseProvided for historical documentation only. Check Missouri Extension and Agricultural Experiment Station sites for current information.eng
dc.subjectdairy waste managementeng
dc.subjectgroundwater protectioneng
dc.subjectregulatory requirementseng
dc.subjectfertilizer resourceeng
dc.subject.lcshDairy cattle -- Manure -- Environmental aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshFertilizerseng
dc.titleSpreading dairy waste with lab analysis but without soil tests (2009)eng
dc.typeDocumenteng


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