Now showing items 21-37 of 37

  • Influence of Catullus on Latin poetry of the Augustan age 

    Beamer, Maude, 1885-1973 (University of Missouri, 1915)
    To what extent Catullus was a factor in the poetry of the Augustan age, or more accurately, what he contributed to it in form and substance is the object of this inquiry. A sympathetic reading of his poems alone assures ...
  • Mythology of Propertius 

    Martin, Donnis (University of Missouri, 1913)
    It is seldom that the mythology of the ancient Greeks and Romans is distinguished from their religion. This arises largely from the fact that the same supernatural beings figure in each. But mythology and religion represent ...
  • Persius' debt to Horace. 

    Eitzen, Hetha Amelia (University of Missouri, 1906)
    In the comparison of the Satires of Persius with those of Horace it will be found that there are many similar passages. Some of these passages are alike in thought, while others contain the same group of words, but the ...
  • Presentation and stage setting of Greek tragedy of the fifth century B.C. 

    Jenkins, Charles Oscar (University of Missouri, 1902)
    The purpose of this thesis is to see what facts we may gather concerning the presentation and stage setting of Greek Tragedy of the fifth century B. C. from the study of the extant plays of Aeschylus and several of those ...
  • Puns in Plautus 

    Moore, Henry Thomas (University of Missouri, 1904)
    A pun is commonly defined as an expression in which the use of a word in two different applications, or the use of two different words pronounced alike or nearly alike, presents an odd or ludicrous idea. But time and again ...
  • Pure place constructions in Vergil's Aeneid, books I-VI 

    Koch, Edwin Oswald, b. 1880 (University of Missouri, 1911)
    The Place Constructions together with their nearest related forms constitute an exceedingly large and important part of the division known as adverbial constructions. How numerous they are may be partly realized from the ...
  • Religion of Tibullus 

    Martin, Gladys, 1891-1979 (University of Missouri, 1913)
    Tibullus is generally considered a poet sincere and devout in his religion; for he is constantly invoking the presence of the divinities, vowing sacrifice to them, and dwelling upon their beneficence to mankind. It is the ...
  • Senex in Plautus 

    Booth, Bertha Ellis (University of Missouri, 1911)
    Among the principal characters that crowd the busy stage of Plautus, none are more vital to the action than the old gentlemen. But while the women of Plautus have received lengthy treatment at the hands of Le Benoist in ...
  • Some examples of repetition in Terence 

    Robinson, Rodney Potter, 1890- (University of Missouri, 1911)
    The cumulation of synonyms, that is, the use within a sentence of words similar in meaning but different in form, and the securing of various sound effects by the collocation of words different in meaning but similar in ...
  • Some word-grouping in Lucan's Pharsalia 

    Johnson, Isabell (University of Missouri, 1911)
    The first century after Christ, known as the Silver Age of Roman Literature, was marked by a brutal despotism, which stifled all independent intellectual life. Affectation and hypocrisy were the result of the embargo laid ...
  • Sound effects in Lucretius 

    Boyd, Laura Alice (University of Missouri, 1907)
    When the Greek philosophers first began to write down the results of their investigations they chose verse as the medium through which to present their ideas to the world. This was very natural for poetry was the medium ...
  • Study of the rhetorical figures in the odes of Horace 

    Dunn, James Arthur (University of Missouri, 1909)
    The purpose of this paper is a study of the more important Figures of Rhetoric as found in the Four Books of the Odes of Horace. While editors of Horace have, in their editions, here and there pointed out scattered instances ...
  • The use of faxo and obsecro in Plautus 

    Stump, Margaret Lou (University of Missouri, 1904)
    In the reading of Plautus one notices many words used paratactically which in classical Latin subordinate the following clause. Prominent among these words are faxo and obsecro, and it is the purpose of this paper to ...
  • The use of simul, simul ac (atque) and synonyms, cum primum, ut primum and ubi primum, from the Ciceronian period on 

    Sewall, Helen Alberta (University of Missouri, 1905)
    A language when compared to a people shows many points of similarity. Though both are continuous themselves, each is made up of individual units that have their birth, growth and death, but in the case of words, as not ...
  • The use of simul, simulac (atque) and synonyms, cum primum ut primum and ubi primum from the earliest literature down to the Augustan age 

    Corder, Lotta F. (University of Missouri, 1905)
    The Latin language has a large number of equivalent expressions meaning "as soon as". If they are compared with those used for any other single temporal idea, they are found to be far more numerous than those used for ...
  • The use of the fable in Roman satire 

    Reid, Martha McKenzie. (University of Missouri, 1913)
    It is the purpose of this paper to collect, discuss, and as far as possible to trace to their origin the fables which are used in Latin Satire. The term Satire has been used throughout the discussion to designate those ...
  • Woman in the epic 

    Carter, Lucile Armer (University of Missouri, 1916)
    Within the pale of that civilization which has grown up under the combined influence of the Christian religion as paramount and what may be called the Teutonic manners as secondary, we find the idea of Woman and her social ...