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dc.contributor.advisorNilon, Charles H., 1956-eng
dc.contributor.authorVan Velsor, Stanley W., 1949-eng
dc.date.issued2004eng
dc.date.submitted2004 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (June 29, 2006)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2004.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Fisheries and wildlife.eng
dc.description.abstractAn increase in urbanization has contributed to an increase in the general public's isolation from traditional uses of wildlife and led to changes in attitudes toward wildlife. Although the majority of people live in urban areas, urban wildlife has received relatively limited attention from public wildlife agencies. Additionally, the information that has been gathered is based on the attitudes of predominately White Americans in suburban environments. Ethnic minorities make up a significant percentage of the urban population in the United States, yet few studies have investigated the wildlife-related experience of these citizens. Understanding the urban realities and subjective meanings that shape people's lives is essential to effectively address the human dimensions of wildlife management programming in an urban environment. Using a grounded theory research approach (dimensional analysis), I identified 5 conditions in the lives of the study participants (i.e., attitudes toward wildlife, demographic characteristics of the participants, socialization, place of residence, and wildlife encounters) which are important factors in shaping 5 general processes (i.e., connecting with wildlife, negotiating safety, selective engagement with wildlife, enduring wildlife, wildlife disconnect) that describe the differing experiences of urban African American and Latino adolescents with respect to wildlife. The implications of these findings suggest that urban African American and Latino adolescents will demonstrate differing levels of engagement with wildlife management programming depending on their experience with wildlife, ranging from active engagement in wildlife management issues to complete disengagement with wildlife. These findings suggest that to foster an appreciation for the multiple values of wildlife and encourage supportive behavior for wildlife management programming, several conditions should be present in a developing child's life: 1) childhood access to and immersion in natural areas, 2) supportive mentoring from adults important in a child's life, 3) positive encounters with a variety of wildlife species, and 4) involvement in a variety of wildlife-related activities in a supportive environment.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb55844741eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4090eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshNature studyeng
dc.subject.lcshNatural history -- Study and teachingeng
dc.subject.lcshMinority teenagerseng
dc.titleA qualitative investigation of the urban minority adolescent experience with wildlifeeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and wildlife sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missourieng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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