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dc.contributor.advisorHammer, R. Davideng
dc.contributor.authorFabian, Christopher J.eng
dc.date.issued2004eng
dc.date.submitted2004 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (June 30, 2006)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2004.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Soil and atmospheric sciences.eng
dc.description.abstractLand characterization and classification is central to sound natural resource management. Forest land classifications usually lack sufficient detail, are not scale-adjustable, and are limited in scope and applications for the spectrum of relevant management decisions. Two alternatives for forest land classification have been proposed: a multifactor ecological land classification system (ECS) and a soil survey approach that is more geomorphic-based, comprehensive and forestry oriented than traditional classifications. Landforms influence important site factors, are easily observable features, and are relatively stabile in the landscape, so are a logical base for land classification systems. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) was used with Digital Elevation Models (DEM's) to produce Digital Terrain Models (DTM's) in the Missouri Ozarks. Terrain models produced from several DEM sources were evaluated for their accuracy in predicting slope, aspect and landforms on a 3691 ha area. The DEM's created from USGS hypsography were most accurate. Slope classes were correctly identified in 71.6% and aspect classes in 84.6% of observations. A rule-based approach to classifying landforms agreed with a field survey on 71.2% of the calibration site and 64.3% of the test site. A soil-geomorphic ecological approach using terrain modeling proved to be an accurate, consistent, efficient and cost-effective method.eng
dc.identifier.merlin.b55848060eng
dc.identifier.otherFabianC-111504-T784eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4107eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2004 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2004 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshForests and forestry -- Classificationeng
dc.subject.lcshSoil surveyseng
dc.titleApplication of a digital terrain model for forrest land classification and soil surveyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, environmental and atmospheric sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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