Comparing two comprehensive reform models: their effect on student reading achievement

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Comparing two comprehensive reform models: their effect on student reading achievement

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4120

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Title: Comparing two comprehensive reform models: their effect on student reading achievement
Author: Gines, Bobby E., 1945-
Date: 2005
Publisher: University of Missouri--Columbia
Abstract: Purpose of the Study. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two different school comprehensive reform models on student reading achievement. The study began by asking the following research question: Is there a difference in student reading performance when two comprehensive school reform models, Success for All and the Accelerated Schools model are compared? Research Question. Is there a significant difference in student reading performance when two comprehensive school reform models, Success for All and the Accelerated Schools model are compared at 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades? Procedure. Approximately 400 students in each of grades 3, 4, and 5 from two schools in an urban school district in North St. Louis County participated in the study. The students were nonrandomly assigned and administered the Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI), pre- and posttest. The data were collected and statistically analyzed using an analysis of variance (ANOVA). Findings. A significant difference was found between average NCE reading gain scores at grade 3 between the two schools in the study, but no significant differences were found between gender or the interaction between school and gender. No significant differences were found between average NCE reading gain scores for grades 4 and 5 between the two schools. In addition, no significant difference was found for gender, lunch, or the interaction between school and gender, or the interaction between school and lunch, or the interaction between school, gender, and lunch. As was the case for 3rd grade, no tests were conducted for ethnicity for the 4th or 5th grade; however, there were sufficient students at the 5th grade to tests for lunch status.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4120
Other Identifiers: GinesB-080205-D3033

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