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dc.contributor.advisorAndrews, Richard L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGines, Bobby E., 1945-en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.submitted2005 Summeren
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (July 17, 2006)en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionVita.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2005.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational administration.en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose of the Study. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two different school comprehensive reform models on student reading achievement. The study began by asking the following research question: Is there a difference in student reading performance when two comprehensive school reform models, Success for All and the Accelerated Schools model are compared? Research Question. Is there a significant difference in student reading performance when two comprehensive school reform models, Success for All and the Accelerated Schools model are compared at 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades? Procedure. Approximately 400 students in each of grades 3, 4, and 5 from two schools in an urban school district in North St. Louis County participated in the study. The students were nonrandomly assigned and administered the Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI), pre- and posttest. The data were collected and statistically analyzed using an analysis of variance (ANOVA). Findings. A significant difference was found between average NCE reading gain scores at grade 3 between the two schools in the study, but no significant differences were found between gender or the interaction between school and gender. No significant differences were found between average NCE reading gain scores for grades 4 and 5 between the two schools. In addition, no significant difference was found for gender, lunch, or the interaction between school and gender, or the interaction between school and lunch, or the interaction between school, gender, and lunch. As was the case for 3rd grade, no tests were conducted for ethnicity for the 4th or 5th grade; however, there were sufficient students at the 5th grade to tests for lunch status.en_US
dc.identifier.merlin.b55891627en_US
dc.identifier.otherGinesB-080205-D3033en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4120
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2005 Freely available dissertations (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2005 Dissertations
dc.subject.lcshReading (Elementary)en_US
dc.subject.lcshEducation, Elementaryen_US
dc.titleComparing two comprehensive reform models: their effect on student reading achievementen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.en_US


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