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dc.contributor.advisorLannin, John K.eng
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Brian E., 1976-eng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.date.submitted2005 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (November 14, 2006)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2005.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Curriculum and instruction.eng
dc.description.abstractRecent curricular recommendations (NCTM, 2000; RAND, 2003) call for the development of student flexibility in relation to algebraic reasoning. In response to these recommendations, this study focused on the algebraic strategies employed by the participants and their flexibility in understanding various generalization strategies when generalizing numeric situations. Algebraic flexibility consisted of two components: (a) Within-task flexibility (recognizing appropriate generalization strategies that could be used for a particular task) and cross-task flexibility (recognizing when a generalization strategy could be applied to various tasks). Eleven tenth-grade students from two rural schools participated in active interviews (Holstein & Gubrium, 1995) centered on developing generalizations for contextualized algebraic tasks. Following the development of a generalization for a particular task, participants were provided alternative student strategies to examine.The results demonstrated that secondary students employ the same generalization strategies as elementary and middle level students: explicit, whole-object, recursive, and chunking. Participants used recursive (92.3%) and chunking (90%) strategies with the greatest success, while the explicit strategy was the least effective (correctly used 60% of the time). Participants classified as exhibiting a high level of flexibility did not necessarily demonstrate that ability in initially generalizing tasks. The participants fell along a range for both within-task and cross-task flexibility. Participants classified as exhibiting a high level of flexibility were able to determine the applicability of a strategy and develop contextually-justified rules. Students with low flexibility were unable to determine the applicability of a strategy or justify their rules.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb57114675eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4131
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4131eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshAlgebraic logiceng
dc.subject.lcshAlgebra -- Study and teaching (Secondary)eng
dc.titleExamining secondary students algebraic reasoning: flexibility and strategy useeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineLearning, teaching and curriculum (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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