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dc.contributor.advisorWall, Judy D.eng
dc.contributor.authorPayne, Rayford B., 1974-eng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.date.submitted2005 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on December 22, 2006).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.description"May 2005"eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2005.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Microbiology (Medicine).eng
dc.description.abstractSulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) of the genus Desulfovibrio can breathe uranium in a manner similar to the way in which we (human beings) breathe oxygen. In respiration, we transfer electrons from food to oxygen, producing water, SRB transfer electrons of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV). (This transfer of electrons is also called reduction.) The reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) alters the solubility state of the uranium from a soluble to an insoluble, and therefore less biologically available, form. Because SRB are commonly found in uranium contaminated groundwater and soil, it is theoretically possible that we could use them to bioremediate uranium contaminated environments. However, before we attempt to use SRB to bioremediate uranium contaminated environments, we must first understand the SRB genes and enzymes involved in the process of uranium reduction. We have determined that the enzyme cytochrome c3 can act as a U(VI) reductase by Desulfovibrio when hydrogen gas is the energy source; however, alternate pathways utilizing organic compounds for U(VI) reduction exist. In addition, we have observed that Desulfovibrio that have been previously exposed to uranium (such as those bacteria that would be found in a uranium contaminated environment) are impaired in utilizing some organic compounds, but not hydrogen gas, as an energy source for uranium (VI) reduction. This suggests that in order for us to use SRB to treat uranium contaminated environments, it would be more efficient to add hydrogen gas, not organic compounds, as an energy source for the SRB.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb57475167eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4135
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.meshDesulfovibrio -- metabolismeng
dc.subject.meshCytochrome c Group -- metabolismeng
dc.subject.meshElectron transporteng
dc.subject.meshUranium -- Metabolismeng
dc.titleEnergy metabolism and uranium (VI) reduction by Desulfovibrioeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology (Medicine) (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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