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dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Nicolaeng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.description.abstractIncentives are commonly perceived to be one of the primary motivational forces that drive a capitalistic economy. By in large, they are seen within the orthodox economic disciplinary field as the counterpart to self-interest and rational choice theory. They are described as not merely wanted but needed. The aim of this paper is to invalidate the myth that incentives are necessary for the regeneration of society. Instead, it is put forward that the two fundamental components required are human instincts and habits (which encompass norms, mores and values). In this light, the explanation of incentives as a driving mechanism for economic renewal becomes diminished.eng
dc.format.extent17 pageseng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Interdisciplinary Research, 2012, article 201203eng
dc.identifier.issn1937-2647eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/41417eng
dc.publisherInterdisciplinary Doctoral Student Council at the University of Missouri-Kansas Cityeng
dc.subject.lcshIncentive awardseng
dc.subject.lcshEmployee motivationeng
dc.titleIncentives : The Scaffolding that Keeps Economic Orthodoxy from Teetering into Oblivion?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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