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dc.contributor.advisorAlbu, Cristinaeng
dc.contributor.authorAubrey, Jillian Charmaineeng
dc.contributor.sponsorArt and Art History
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page, viewed on March 20, 2014eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Cristina Albueng
dc.descriptionVitaeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 127-133)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M. A.)--Dept. of Art and Art History. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2013eng
dc.description.abstractContemporary artists Rirkrit Tiravanija and Jennifer Rubell offer food and sociability both literally and metaphorically. By inviting exhibition visitors to eat meals in specially conceived spaces within art galleries, both artists encourage participatory modes of spectatorship and challenge the social norms that generally regulate the art viewer's behavior. While the social ties inspired by these art practices have been amply analyzed, the aesthetic qualities of the spaces in which the meals are served, remain largely disregarded. This paper argues that the features of Tiravanija and Rubell's environments, strategically framed within art institutions, affect the social relations between viewers. Context ultimately shapes behavior: the participatory exchanges engendered by these artists simply would not be the same were they to take place in a different setting. Tiravanija's Untitled (Free), (1992, 1995, 2007, 2011), the 2004 retrospective, "Rirkrit Tiravanija: A Retrospective (Tomorrow is another fine day)," and Rubell's Creation, encourage participatory modes of spectatorship that are contingent both upon social factors and upon the spaces in which they are staged. According to Nicolas Bourriaud's theory of relational aesthetics, the strength of Tiravanija and Rubell's works lies in their ability to create ephemeral face-to-face encounters between participants. I contend that this promise of conviviality through collective food consumption cannot be fulfilled independently of the environments where social relations are formed. In addition to Bourriaud's theories, this analysis relies on Michel Foucault and Gaston Bachelard to highlight the role of physical space in structuring social ties, triggering emotional connections, and catalyzing poetic introspection in Tiravanija and Rubell's artistic practices. I have coined the term "eatopia" to highlight the aesthetic qualities of the spaces where Tiravanija and Rubell serve food in order to compensate for the increasing loss of sociability in contemporary societies. Despite their somewhat utopian qualities, their works are embedded in specific contexts that are not to be overlooked. The findings in this thesis provide an alternative understanding of Tiravanija and Rubell's art practices by analyzing not only the public social exchange between art participants, but also the feelings of intimacy and familiarity catalyzed by their multisensorial environmentseng
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of Arts and Sciences
dc.description.tableofcontentsAbstract -- List of illustrations -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Futurist banquets, relational aesthetics, and the meals served in between -- Curry home: spatial intimacy in Rirkrit Tiravania's Eatopias -- Sensational scenes: Jennifer Rubell's Physical and social landscapes -- Public privacy: notes on the eatopic paradox and the politics of installation -- Illustrations -- Reference listeng
dc.description.versionmonographic
dc.format.extentx, 135 pageseng
dc.format.mediumtext
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/41447eng
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.isversionofVersion of record
dc.rightsOpen Access (fully available)
dc.rights.holderCopyright retained by author
dc.subject.lcshFood in arteng
dc.subject.lcshFood consumption -- Arteng
dc.subject.lcshArt museums -- Food consumptioneng
dc.subject.otherThesis -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Arteng
dc.subject.otherThesis -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Art historyeng
dc.titleEatopia: aesthetic spaces of collective food consumption in contemporary arteng
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.genreGraduate
thesis.degree.disciplineArt and Art Historyeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameMA (Master of Arts)eng


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