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dc.contributor.advisorZiskin, Rochelleeng
dc.contributor.authorGray, Meghan L.eng
dc.contributor.sponsorArt and Art History
dc.coverage.spatialMissouri -- Kansas Cityeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page, viewed on March 26, 2014eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Rochelle Ziskineng
dc.descriptionVitaeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographic references (pages 107-114)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M. A.)--Dept. of Art and Art History. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2013eng
dc.description.abstractThe Municipal Auditorium is a grand civic building in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, which encompasses venues for theater, music and athletics. Designed by Gentry, Voskamp, and Neville, and associated architects, Hoit, Price, and Barnes, and built between 1933-1936 during the Depression, the structure is a Streamline Moderne relic that has been underappreciated in recent times. More than thirty years ago, Cydney Millstein created the only dedicated study of the building, but her research dealt primarily with the history of its creation. In my research, I examine its place in the political climate and infamous boss system of Kansas City. I also underscore the city's need for a new auditorium by illustrating the outdated previous convention halls in Kansas City. Additionally, I site the Municipal Auditorium within the architects' oeuvre and examine how auditoriums from other cities influenced their designs. Two of the most inspirational auditoriums were the Radio City Music Hall and the RKO-Roxy Theater in New York City, which have never before been compared to Kansas City's auditorium in such detail. And yet, the Municipal Auditorium retains its own impressive brand of Midwestern restraint and stateliness. As a grand civic building, many city officials, architects, and artists worked together to create the Municipal Auditorium, but some of their contributions have been forgotten over the years. By using personal scrapbooks and a diary from architect Alfred Barnes, interviews with architect Homer Neville and with architect Alonzo Gentry's niece, newspaper articles from the 1930s, and original sketches and architectural plans, my research uncovers these significant contributions. Together they make up the streamlined shell and the opulent interior of the Municipal Auditoriumeng
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of Arts and Sciences
dc.description.tableofcontentsAbstract -- List of illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- A monument of stone and concrete: Kansas City politics and the Municipal Auditorium -- The Kansas City spirit reignited: Conrad Mann and the ten-year plan -- Scandal and sketches: how a small firm won a big commission -- The Municipal Auditorium and Music Hall: the "Radio City" of the Midwest -- Conclusion -- Bibliographyeng
dc.description.versionmonographic
dc.format.extentxii, 115 pageseng
dc.format.mediumtext
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/41488eng
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.isversionofVersion of record
dc.rightsOpen Access (fully available)
dc.rights.holderCopyright retained by author
dc.subject.lcshMunicipal Auditorium (Kansas City, Mo.)eng
dc.subject.otherArt historyeng
dc.subject.otherThesis -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Art and art history.eng
dc.titleForgotten landmark: the Municipal Auditorium of Kansas City, Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.genreGraduate
thesis.degree.disciplineArt and Art History (UMKC)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameMA (Master of Arts)eng


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