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dc.contributor.advisorKelly, Patricia J. (Patricia Jane)eng
dc.contributor.authorPerkins, Danielle Elizabeth Kristinaeng
dc.date.issued2014-03-31eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page, viewed on March 31, 2014eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Patricia J. Kellyeng
dc.descriptionVitaeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 94-101)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--School of Nursing and Health Studies. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2013eng
dc.description.abstractOne in three Black men in the U.S. faces difficulties obtaining employment, housing and maintaining self-sufficiency post incarceration. Felony records result in considerable social and economic vulnerability, which place many young Black men at risk for depression. However, very little is known about depression in young Black men or how depression is experienced and perceived by those with a felony record. Further, cultural and gender divergences from traditional clinical definitions and symptomatology of depression can complicate accurate and efficient identification of depression in these young men. Therefore, the purpose of this research was 1) to explore experiences and perceptions of depression in young Black men who have a history of incarceration and 2) to explore the social consequences of depression in this population. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty Black men who have a history of incarceration to explore individual perceptions and experiences of depression. Data were analyzed using an inductive process and thematic analysis. Emergent themes for individual experiences and perceptions of depression were a) anger and negativity, b) depression is weakness, c) invisible depression, d) being strong and going on and e) our depression is different. With regard to societal consequences, participants overwhelmingly reported that they believed that no one cared about the depression experiences of young Black men. Findings from this study suggest the need for research to develop screening and assessment tools that accurately measure depression in this population. Findings also have implications for clinicians who identify and initiate ongoing therapeutic relationships with young Black men with depression. Mental health promotion programs that target the specific needs of this population are also warrantedeng
dc.description.tableofcontentsAbstract -- List of tables -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Literature review -- Methodology -- Study manuscript -- Appendix -- Participant interest notecard -- Interview form -- Depression study information form -- Demographic form -- Receipts -- Transcription confidentiality form -- UMKC IRB authorization -- Letter of support -- Referenceseng
dc.format.extentx, 102 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/41501eng
dc.subject.lcshDepression, Mental -- African American meneng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American men -- Psychologyeng
dc.subject.otherDissertation -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Nursingeng
dc.titleExperiences and Perceptions of Depression in Young Black Men after Incarcerationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineNursing (UMKC)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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