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dc.contributor.authorGilmore, Ari
dc.contributor.authorKelsberg, Gary
dc.contributor.authorSafranek, Sarah
dc.date.issued2010-01eng
dc.description.abstractSimple surgical excision is associated with a low risk of recurrence, but often leaves a visible scar. Curettage or shave excision, with cautery, is more likely to succeed in 1 session than cryotherapy; both may leave a smaller scar than surgery. Laser therapy, which may require multiple sessions, and sclerotherapy may be least likely to cause visible scarring (strength of recommendation [SOR]: C, small cohort studies and case series). Untreated pyogenic granulomas regress spontaneously within 6 to 18 months with some risk of scarring (SOR: C, a subset of patients in a retrospective cohort study).en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 59(1) 2010: 40+.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4219
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networken
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2010 (MU)en
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Network
dc.subjecttreatment methoden
dc.subjectgranulomaen
dc.subjectspontaneous regressionen
dc.subject.lcshGranuloma -- Treatmenten
dc.subject.lcshBacterial diseases -- Treatmenten
dc.subject.lcshCauteryen
dc.titleWhat's the best treatment for pyogenic granuloma?en
dc.typeArticleen


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