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dc.contributor.advisorShifley, Stephen R.eng
dc.contributor.advisorLarsen, David R. (David Rolf)eng
dc.contributor.authorLootens, Jameseng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.date.submitted2005 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (December 13, 2006)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2005.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Forestry.eng
dc.description.abstractA model for predicting total tree height as a function of tree diameter was calibrated for twelve tree species common to the Missouri Ozarks. Model coefficients were derived from nearly 10,000 observed trees. The calibrated model did a good job predicting the mean height-diameter trend for each species (pseudo-R2 values ranged from 0.56 to 0.88), but for a given tree diameter observed tree heights were highly variable. In addition, an evaluation of the Central States variant of the Forest Vegetation Simulator (CS-FVS), a distance-independent, single-tree growth model was performed on forest inventory data from a managed, uneven-aged forest in the Missouri Ozark Highlands. Simulations were run for ten and forty year time periods, and evaluated diameter growth, number of trees per acre, and basal area. The model was also evaluated with and without providing diameter increment calibration information. CS-FVS performed reasonably well in predicting diameter growth, as compared to other evaluations of similar models. The model consistently overpredicted the number of trees per acre and basal area for all simulations. The model underpredicted mortality, especially for black and scarlet oak. Diameter increment information improved prediction the most for diameter growth and basal area estimations.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb57324062eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4284eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2005 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2005 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshTrees -- Growth -- Mathematical modelseng
dc.subject.lcshForests and forestryeng
dc.titleEstimation of total height, growth, and mortality of forest trees in Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineForestry (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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