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dc.contributor.advisorSalim, Hani A., 1966-eng
dc.contributor.authorMuenks, Matthew Josepheng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionA Thesis presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School at the University of Missouri--Columbia In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Science in Civil and Environmental Engineering.eng
dc.descriptionGraduate advisor: Dr. Hani Salim.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 116-117).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire text is included in the research.pdf file; the abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical general description appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The retrofit of existing structures to resist external explosions is becoming increasingly necessary. The use of thin sheets on the tension face of a wall is one of the viable methods for blast retrofit of infill wall systems. Previous research at the University of Missouri-Columbia utilized: thin sheets of polypropylene, steel, polyurea, polyvinyl-chloride (PVC), and spray-on-polymers. Current research uses a newly developed Polymer-Fiber Composite Sheet (PFCS) that exhibits desirable properties, such as large ductility and high strength-to-weight ratio. This thesis evaluates the feasibility of PFCS and bent plates for blast retrofit of CMU infill walls. To promote the widespread use of PFCS for blast retrofit, it is necessary to develop an engineering design and analysis methodology for predicting the dynamic response of a PFCS and CMU wall system. Therefore, the engineering properties of the composite sheets, the connection details, and a preliminary static resistance function for the PFCS are evaluated experimentally in this thesis. The research has focused on evaluating the load-deflection response of the PFCS at the macro level using full scale tension tests. The connection response in tension of bent plates used to anchor sheet retrofit to building floors is experimentally evaluated in this thesis. In addition, the response of connections and sheets under uniform transverse pressure is evaluated experimentally using a full-scale loading tree. The results show that the fiber architecture has a significant effect on the response of the sheet. Based on the results of this research, polymer fiber composite sheets are capable of sustaining large amounts of strain while maintaining moderate loads. Together, these two properties make PFCS a viable blast sheet retrofit.eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (xvii, pages) : illustrations (chiefly color)eng
dc.identifier.oclc889352162eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/43148
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/43148eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subject.lcshFiber-reinforced plastics -- Evaluation.eng
dc.subject.lcshBlast effect.eng
dc.subject.lcshBuildings -- Blast effects.eng
dc.titleCharacterization of polymer-fiber composite sheet retrofits for blast mitigationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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