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dc.contributor.advisorLever, Teresaeng
dc.contributor.authorSell, Meghaneng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionMay 2013.eng
dc.description"A Thesis presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School at the University of Missouri-Columbia In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Health Science."eng
dc.descriptionThesis supervisor: Dr. Teresa Lever.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 33-36).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire text is included in the research.pdf file; the abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical general description appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The goal of this study was to develop a protocol to facilitate identification and quantification of the pathological components of the complex neural swallow circuit in mice, the model organism identified by the NIH for studying human neurological diseases. Investigating the relatively simple neural circuit of the laryngeal adductor reflex (LAR) in mice may help elucidate the underlying pathology contributing to dysphagia in neurological diseases. Ninety-eight healthy mice between 3-6 months of age underwent a surgical procedure to trigger the LAR while recording associated laryngeal brainstem evoked potential responses (LBR) via subcutaneous needle electrodes. A 2.0 Hz electrical stimulus was directly applied to the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) at various intensities to evoke the LAR. LBR waveforms were extracted from background EEG using traditional signal averaging. Several positive and negative peaks were detected within 10 ms after SLN stimulation. Quantification of response peaks relative to amplitude and latency will provide normative data for comparison with mouse models of human diseases. The neurological components recruited during LAR are also recruited during swallowing; however, the swallow reflex is more complex and involves additional brain regions. Therefore, the LAR may provide a simplified window into the investigation of swallowing and may ultimately translate into noninvasive clinical methods for use with humans with dysphagia as a consequence of neurological diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (v, 36 pages) : color illustrations.eng
dc.identifier.oclc891383062eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/43153
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/43153eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2013 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subject.lcshDeglutition disorders.eng
dc.subject.lcshLarynx -- Muscles.eng
dc.subject.lcshReflexes -- Testing.eng
dc.titleUsing the laryngeal adductor reflex to investigate swallowingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication science and disorders (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.H.S.eng


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